What the Increasing National Debt, Deficit Could Mean for You

What the Increasing National Debt, Deficit Could Mean for You

If you’d like to see a snapshot of what’s going on with national debt versus revenue, check out the U.S. Debt Clock. While there’s a lot moving on one screen, you can take a look at individual blocks to see how much the U.S. takes in via tax revenues compared to what...

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How the Pandemic Is Affecting the Real Estate Market

How the Pandemic Is Affecting the Real Estate Market

Research has found that over a 150-year period (1870 to 2015), owning a home has proved to be one of the most stable and secure holdings compared to other types of investments. While offering the added benefits of providing shelter and leaving it as a legacy,...

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The Future of Retail Raises More Questions Than Answers

The Future of Retail Raises More Questions Than Answers

Will we learn to live with less? Some lessons were learned when the U.S. initially closed up shop and told everyone to stay home. For example, we can live without extra-soft, double-ply toilet paper and go a whole weekend without shopping at a store or eating at a...

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Rerouting Your Summer Vacation

Rerouting Your Summer Vacation

All is not lost. If you planned a multicity tour across Europe or Asia this summer, you’ve probably already rethought those plans. But that doesn’t mean you have to abandon the idea of a vacation altogether. Perhaps a domestic destination, a little ingenuity and a lot...

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What Might Be Next — Inflation or Deflation?

What Might Be Next — Inflation or Deflation?

Consumer prices fell by 0.8% on a seasonally adjusted basis in April, the biggest drop in more than a dozen years, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported. Conversely, prices for grocery items jumped 2.6%, the highest one-month increase in 46 years, with eggs rising...

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Gender Dynamics: Pre- and Post-Pandemic

Gender Dynamics: Pre- and Post-Pandemic

In past recessions, industries like manufacturing and construction were often the hardest hit. For example, some economists referred to the Great Recession as a “man-cession” because at the outset, more men lost jobs than women. In some households, wives were able to...

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